Surface Phone?

I love my Windows Phone. Unfortunately it’s time to upgrade and I can get a very good Android phone for $200 cheaper than the new Lumia 950. So I’m going to have to say goodbye to the Windows Phone for a few years. That being said Microsoft has done a good thing getting their ecosystem into Android, so although I’ll have an Android it will be running the same ecosystem apps I’m used to (oh Office, you make my life so much easier).

But I’m not here to lament the cost of the new Lumia, but rather to look ahead at what might be. A Surface Phone.

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I Am Not a Wallet

I had this thought last night when trying out Sims Free Play on my phone. Everything takes forever to complete. While most of these pay to speed up games take about one to two minutes to do a task early in the game, just long enough to figure out what else you can do, Sims takes 10-120 minutes. So you set one task, close the game and come back to it later. It’s rather boring. But the game is fun when you’re playing it. Which is all designed to get you to pay for premium currency to make the game play faster. Continue reading “I Am Not a Wallet”

Time for Inside Higher Ed to End Anonymous Comments

There have been many cases against anonymous comments.

Popular science removed their comments entirely for a good reason, as referenced in a New Yorker article:

“The editors argued that Internet comments, particularly anonymous ones, undermine the integrity of science and lead to a culture of aggression and mockery that hinders substantive discourse.”

Huffington post brought up To Kill a Mockingbird:

“Lee’s basic claim is this: We are capable of doing far worse things to one another when we do not have to own up to the things we do.”

The cases for anonymous comments tend to focus on the lack of effect restricting it will have as people are still willing to say terrible things in public under their own names.

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The Mind of a Digital Native

I was reading Lowering Higher Education by James E. Côté and Anton L. Allahar recently and was intrigued by their chapter on Technologies.  In it they discuss the concept of Digital Natives and whether or not they require a different style of teaching or have a different understanding of learning.  Do Digital Natives require a more technologically oriented teaching method in order to be engaged? Côté and Allahar discuss the background of this idea and show how it is based in some misguided philosophy and assumptions, and then focus on results, showing that where universities have increased the amount of technology in their classes there is no proof of a corresponding increase in engagement.

That being said I wanted to discuss what it feels like being a Digital Native and going through, and working in the education system.

I actually dislike the term Digital Native, but as it is the one used in this discourse I’ll continue with it.

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